CES: These are the consumer tech trends to watch for 2020 and beyond, according to show organizers

By Taylor Sober


GeekWire is covering CES 2020 live from Las Vegas, highlighting the latest in consumer electronics, voice assistants, self-driving cars, 5G connectivity, and more.



LAS VEGAS — 5G; artificial intelligence; connected homes; streaming media; cloud-based gaming; mixed reality; electric transportation; telemedicine; task-based robots; and more.


These are the tech topics and trends that researchers from the Consumer Technology Association are watching closely over the next several years. It’s worth a look at their analysis, given that the trade group organizes CES each year and gets extensive exposure to how technology is changing the way we work and live.

CTA hosted its annual “Trends to Watch” session Monday morning before CES officially kicks off Tuesday.


The theme of the talk was that we’re moving from one “IoT” — Internet of Things — to a new “IoT”: Intelligence of Things.


These are the tech topics and trends that researchers from the Consumer Technology Association are watching closely over the next several years. It’s worth a look at their analysis, given that the trade group organizes CES each year and gets extensive exposure to how technology is changing the way we work and live.

CTA hosted its annual “Trends to Watch” session Monday morning before CES officially kicks off Tuesday.


The theme of the talk was that we’re moving from one “IoT” — Internet of Things — to a new “IoT”: Intelligence of Things.


5G



The fifth generation of wireless technology is one of the major narratives of CES 2020. There are now 50 different 5G networks around the world and the number of 5G handset shipments is expected to spike over the next several years. It’s still early for 5G development, but the eventual impact can’t be ignored.


So what does it all mean? For consumers, faster speeds on their devices.


But the real impact will be felt with enterprise, Koenig said. “5G is the first wireless generation that will eventually be led by enterprise applications,” he said. “5G is literally going to overlay the entire economy.”


He pointed to two application areas: massive IoT, with lots of end points, and critical IoT, with fewer end points but more data requirements.


As one industry example, Koenig said farming can be revolutionized with 5G connectivity powering new innovations such as precision agriculture and automated farming equipment. There are several startups in this realm, including some from Seattle, and ag