How to write an Integrated Marketing Communications Plan

Credit by Graham Robertson


The plan must answer the following:

  1. What do we need our advertising to do? (Brand strategic objective statement)

  2. Who is in our desired consumer target? (Most motivated people to buy what we do)

  3. What are we are selling? (Our main consumer benefit we stand behind)

  4. Why should they believe us? (Support points to back up the main benefit)

  5. What is our organizing brand idea? (Brand soul, essence or DNA for the brand)

  6. What do want people to see, think, feel, do, or influence? (Desired consumer impact)

  7. Where will our consumer be most receptive to see and act upon our message? (Media plan)

Here’s an example of what your plan should look like:


Q1. What do we need our advertising to do? (Brand strategic objective statement)


Five major brand strategies help move your brand from one stage of the brand love curve to the next.



For unknown brands, the strategic focus should be to stand out so consumers will notice the brand within a crowded brand world, where they see an estimated 5,000 brand messages per day. For indifferent brands, the strategy must establish the brand in the consumer’s mind so they can see a clear point of difference over their current brand choice. At the like it stage, the strategy is to separate the brand from the pack, creating happy experiences that build a trusted following over time. Only after they trust the brand, they begin to open up. At the love it stage, the focus shifts tightening the bond with the most loyal brand fans. At the beloved stage, the strategic challenge is to create outspoken, loyal fans who are willing to whisper to their friends on the brand’s behalf.


Writing your strategy statements


You should start off by writing your strategic objective statement using the four components of the a + b + c + d model we use for strategic thinking


A: The statement calls out the investment into a strategic program, with crystal clear marching orders to the team, leaving no room for doubt, confusion, or hesitation.


B: You should provide a focused opportunity, which is the breakthrough point where the brand will exert pressure to create a market impact.


C: You must have a specific desired market impact to outline the market stakeholder you will attempt to move, whether it is consumers, sales channels, competitors, or influencers.


D: Finally, you need a specific performance result, linking the market impact to a specific result on the brand, either making the brand more powerful or more profitable.




Q2: Who is in our desired consumer target? (Most motivated people to buy what we do)


Most marketers think of the type of consumers they want to attract. Why not change your thinking and go after those consumers who are already motivated by what your brand offers? So instead of asking, “Who do we want?” you should be saying, “Who wants us?”

I use seven fundamental questions to define and build a profile of your ideal consumer target: