HOW TO CREATE YOUR BRAND POSITIONING STATEMENT

Credit from Beloved Brands


A brand positioning statement focuses on the consumer target your brand will serve and the emotional and functional benefits your brand will stand for.


If you don’t position your brand the way you want, then your customers and competitors will do it for you, and you might not like their answers. A smart brand positioning statement should narrow the target to those consumers who are most capable of loving what the brand does. With your consumer in mind, your brand positioning should find the ideal balance between functional and emotional benefits.


The brand positioning statement zones


Your brand’s winning zone (in green), is the space that matches up “What consumers want” with “What your brand does best.” This space provides you a distinct positioning you can own and defend from attack. Your brand must be able to satisfy the consumer needs better than any other competitor can.



Your brand will not survive by trying to compete in the losing zone (in red), which is the space that matches the consumer needs with “What your competitor does best.” When you play in this space, your competitor will beat you every time.


As markets mature, competitors copy each other. It has become harder to be better with a definitive product win. Many brands have to play in the risky zone (in grey), which is the space where you and your competitor both meet the consumer’s needs in a relative tie.


Sadly, I always have to mention the dumb zone (in blue) where two competitors “battle it out” in the space consumers do not care. One competitor says, “We are faster,” and the other brand says, “We are just as fast.” No one bothered to ask the consumer if they care about speed. Both brands are dumb.


Writing the brand positioning statement


There are 4 elements that make up a brand positioning statement, including who will you serve, where you play, where will you win and why consumers should believe you. These are the consumer target, category, main consumer benefit and support points:


1. Who is the consumer target?

What slice of the population is the most motivated by what your brand offers? Do not just think about who you want, but rather who wants your brand.


2. Where will you play?

What is the competitive set that defines the space in the market your brand competes in? Brand positioning is always relative to who you compete against. For instance, a brand is never fast, it is faster.


3. Where will you win?

What is the main promise you will make to the consumer target, that will make your brand stand out as interesting, simple, unique, motivating and own-able? Do not talk about what you do (features). Talk about what the consumer gets (functional benefits), and how the brand makes them feel (emotional benefits).


4. Why should they believe us?

Understand what support points and features are needed to back up the main promise. Moreover, these support points should close any potential doubts, questions or concerns the consumer has after hearing the main promise.



Before you just randomly write out a brand positioning statement based on your intuition, I will force you to think deeper to focus your decisions on the best possible space for your brand to win and own.


Who is the consumer target market?

The 7 key questions to define the consumer target market:

  1. What is the description of the consumer target market?

  2. What are the consumer’s main needs?

  3. Who is the consumer’s enemy that torments them every day?

  4. What are the insights we know about the consumer?